Raccoon & Raccoon Pics And Raccoon Wallpapers

 Social behavior Of Raccoon
Studies in the 1990s by the ethologists Stanley D. Gehrt and Ulf Hohmann indicated raccoons engage in gender-specific social behaviors and are not typically solitary, as was previously thought.[68][69] Related females often live in a so-called "fission-fusion society", that is, they share a common area and occasionally meet at feeding or resting grounds.[70] Unrelated males often form loose male social groups to maintain their position against foreign males during the mating season—or against other potential invaders.[71] Such a group does not usually consist of more than four individuals.[72] Since some males show aggressive behavior towards unrelated kits, mothers will isolate themselves from other raccoons until their kits are big enough to defend themselves.[73] With respect to these three different modes of life prevalent among raccoons, Hohmann called their social structure a "three class society".[74] Samuel I. Zeveloff, professor of zoology at Weber State University and author of the book Raccoons: A Natural History, is more cautious in his interpretation and concludes at least the females are solitary most of the time and, according to Erik K. Fritzell's study in North Dakota in 1978, males in areas with low population densities are solitary, as well.[75]
The shape and size of a raccoon's home range varies depending on age, gender, and habitat, with adults claiming areas more than twice as large as juveniles.[76] While the size of home ranges in the inhospitable habitat of North Dakota's prairies lay between 7 and 50 km2 (3 and 20 sq mi) for males and between 2 and 16 km2 (1 and 6 sq mi) for females, the average size in a marsh at Lake Erie was 0.49 km2 (0.19 sq mi).[77] Irrespective of whether the home ranges of adjacent groups overlap, they are most likely not actively defended outside the mating season if food supplies are sufficient.[78] Odor marks on prominent spots are assumed to establish home ranges and identify individuals.[79] Urine and feces left at shared latrines may provide additional information about feeding grounds, since raccoons were observed to meet there later for collective eating, sleeping and playing.[80]
Concerning the general behavior patterns of raccoons, Gehrt points out, "typically you'll find 10 to 15 percent that will do the opposite"[81] of what is expected.


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